van Eggermond, Michael

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Michael
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van Eggermond, Michael

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Gerade angezeigt 1 - 10 von 16
  • Publikation
    Evaluation and acceptance of an online cycling training for adults to master complex traffic situations
    (16.11.2023) van Eggermond, Michael; Studer, Nora; Johnson, Lucy; Knecht, Leah; Schaffner, Dorothea
    06 - Präsentation
  • Publikation
    Quantifying the effect of street design on driving speed on urban roads
    (11.05.2023) van Eggermond, Michael; Schaffner, Dorothea; Studer, Nora; Erath, Alexander
    Reducing driving speed is a key factor in improving road safety and combatting noise emissions. Over the last decades, many European cities and countries have reduced the speed limits of residential and neighborhood roads from 50 km/h (30 mph) to 30 km/h (20 mph) or even 20 km/h (12 mph). At the same time, there is a discussion the reduction of the speed limit on main roads in urban areas in several countries. Main roads in urban areas are different from residential roads in several ways, including, but not limited to type of trips, type of vehicles and the presence of public transport, and are therefore limited in design options to reduce speeds. The study at hand reports on a virtual reality study conducted in Switzerland using a driving simulator. To assess whether road design influences driving speed, participants were asked to drive through a series of streets in VR with varying speed limits and street designs. Speed and lateral position were recorded; in a follow-up survey, participants stated their preferred speed along the same segments and were asked about risk aversion. Results indicate that only certain designs result in slightly lower driving speeds, while controlling for self-reported risk aversion and driving style. Given the characteristics of main roads, measures reducing the (perceived) lane width are promising, but require further investigation.
    06 - Präsentation
  • Publikation
    A Virtual reality experiment to study citizen perception of future street scenarios
    (SSRN, 31.03.2023) Sánchez-Vaquerizo, Javier Argota; Hausladen, Carina Ines; Mahajan, Sachit; Matter, Marc; Siebermann, Michael; van Eggermond, Michael; Helbing, Dirk
    The current allocation of street space is based on expected vehicular peak-hour flows. Flexible and adaptive use of this space can respond to changing needs. To evaluate the acceptance of flexible street layouts, several urban environments were designed and implemented in virtual reality. Participants explored these designs in immersive virtual reality in a 2x3 mixed factorial experiment, in which we analysed self-reported, behavioural and physiological responses from participants. Distinct communication strategies were varied between subjects. Participants' responses reveal a preference for familiar solutions. Unconventional street layouts are less preferred, perceived as unsafe and cause a measurably greater stress response. Furthermore, information provision focusing on comparisons led participants to focus primarily on the drawbacks, instead of the advantages, of novel scenarios. When being able to freely express thoughts and opinions, participants were focused more on the impact of the space on behaviour rather than the objective physical features themselves. Especially, this last finding suggests that it is vital to develop new street scenarios in an inclusive and democratic way: the success of innovating urban spaces depends on how well the vast diversity of citizens' needs is considered and met.
    05 - Forschungs- oder Arbeitsbericht
  • Publikation
    Begleitstudie zum Tier-Pilotprojekt in Riehen
    (Hochschule für Architektur, Bau und Geomatik, Institut Bauingenieurwesen, 16.01.2023) Erath, Alexander; van Eggermond, Michael
    05 - Forschungs- oder Arbeitsbericht
  • Publikation
    Sicher und kompetent unterwegs. Eine Analyse zu Velofahrkompetenzen und Unfallprävention
    (VSS, 2023) van Eggermond, Michael; Schaffner, Dorothea; Studer, Nora [in: Strasse & Verkehr]
    Die Förderung des Velofahrens ist zentral für ein nachhaltiges Mobilitätssystem. Dabei kommt der Verkehrssicherheit eine bedeutende Rolle zu. Die Sicherheit kann durch verschiedene Massnahmen erhöht werden: Unabdingbar ist die Verbesserung der Veloinfrastruktur. Für eine sichere Navigation im Mischverkehr in Städten kann zusätzlich die Förderung von Velofahrkompetenzen einen entscheidenden Beitrag zur Vermeidung von Unfällen leisten. Auf Basis von vier Studien legt dieser Beitrag dar, welche Velofahrkompetenzen unfallvermeidend sind und bei welchen Velofahrkompetenzen sich bei der Schweizer Bevölkerung ein Entwicklungspotenzial zeigt sowie wie Velofahrkompetenzen mit einem digitalen Training gefördert werden können.
    01B - Beitrag in Magazin oder Zeitung
  • Publikation
    Quantifizierung der Wirkung von Elementen des Strassenraumes auf die gefahrene Geschwindigkeit
    (Bundesamt für Strassen (ASTRA), 12/2022) Schaffner, Dorothea; Studer, Nora; Kaufmann, Kaspar; Yildirimlar, Okan; Erath, Alexander; van Eggermond, Michael; Kalunder, Madlaina; Schubiger, Simon; Hüsser, Cloe; Zirn, Andrea; Schweizer, Nina; Gasser, Yves; Fischer, Raffael; Lauper, Severin
    05 - Forschungs- oder Arbeitsbericht
  • Publikation
    Assessing cycling skills in Switzerland
    (11/2022) van Eggermond, Michael; Schaffner, Dorothea; Studer, Nora
    For many people, safety concerns are a major barrier to ride a bicycle. Indeed, cyclists bear a higher risk than most other types of road users. Improving cycling infrastructure is the most obvious and effective way to increase cycling safety. This paper sets out to identify skills required by cyclists to navigate safely through an urban environment in Switzerland. We set out to identify situations that might result in accidents and require specific competences. This research has shown that there is potential to further develop cyclists’ skills. Rather than focusing on motoric skills or presenting simple situations, we advise that skills should be trained based on more complex situations. These situations include turning, branching, maintaining distance from parked cars and recognising right of way in residential areas.
    04B - Beitrag Konferenzschrift
  • Publikation
    Self-explaining roads: Effects of road design on perception and speed choice
    (08/2022) Schaffner, Dorothea; van Eggermond, Michael; Studer, Nora
    Since speed is a crucial factor contributing to car accidents, one of the greatest potentials for improving road safety lies in reducing driving speed (Aarts and van Schagen, 2006). Conventional measures such as speed limits and law enforcement have their merit but also limitations. A complementary measure to achieve speed reduction is based on the concept of self-explaining roads (SER; Theeuwes & Godthelp, 1995). The concept postulates that road design impacts speed choice based on psychological factors of perception. Previous research has demonstrated the impact of road design on speed choice for a limited number of road design features (e.g. curves, road width). Furthermore, existing research only offers limited insights into the psychological mechanisms driving these effects. Therefore, this experimental study, first, aims to the impact of several novel road features on speed choice. Second, it analyses the underlying psychological mechanisms, explaining the effects of road design on speed choice.
    06 - Präsentation
  • Publikation
    Forecasting district-wide pedestrian volumes in multi-level networks in high-density mixed-use areas
    (Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (HVL), 06/2022) Mavros, Panos; van Eggermond, Michael; Erath, Alexander; Helle, Veera; Acebillo, Pablo; Xu, Shuchen; van Nees, Akkelies; de Koning, Remco Elric; Jacobsen Åsli, Thale [in: 13th International Space Syntax Symposium]
    This paper is concerned with improvements in the forecasting of pedestrian flows in multilevel pedestrian networks in high-density urban environments. 3D network topology measures are combined with land-use data, and validated against extensive pedestrian counts, to provide both evidence for the applicability of network analysis in tropical metropolises, as well as a calibrated tool for urban planners. The research focuses on four area in Singapore. These areas have in common that they all are prominent transport hubs, but differ in surrounding land-use types and dominant network topology (e.g. indoor, outdoor, above ground, below ground, at grade). Multi-level pedestrian networks were drawn based on OpenStreetMap, include sidewalks on both sides of major roads for a radius up to 2 kilometres from the site centroids. Spatial network analysis was performed using sDNA which allows vertical networks to generate measures describing the spatial configuration of the network. Subsequently, pedestrian counts were conducted during three consecutive days. In total, counts were conducted at more than 250 locations in 2018 and 2019, well before the global COVID19 pandemic. Pedestrian flows are set against a series of variables, including pedestrian attractors and generators (e.g. shops, offices, hotels, dwellings), and variables describing the spatial configuration of the network, using advanced regression models. Our results show that betweenness metrics (i.e. space syntax choice) combined with land-use yield high predictive power. Dependent on the study site, network metrics based on angular distance outperform those based on metric distance or perceived link distance. This research demonstrates that is necessary to account for the multi-level nature of networks, and that indoor flows through private developments cannot be neglected, in particular when planning for integrated transport developments. The paper concludes with recommendations and implications for practice.
    04B - Beitrag Konferenzschrift
  • Publikation
    Human navigation in a multilevel travelling salesperson problem
    (PsyArXiv, 22.01.2022) Mavros, Panagiotis; van Eggermond, Michael; Hölscher, Christoph
    Finding the optimal tour that visits a series of locations sequentially, such as going for errands, is an everyday task formally known as the travelling salesperson problem (TSP). In this article we focus on the understudied type of multilevel or M-TSP, which take place in a multilevel environment, like a building. In a TSP, the number of alternative tours the decision-maker needs to consider is given by the factorial of the locations to visit; hence a 3-target TSP has 6 alternatives and a 12- target TSP has 479 million. Considerable research has focused on combinatorial optimisation algorithms for TSPs, and in the cognitive sciences there has equally been a sustained interest on how various foraging species and humans achieve remarkably optimal performance. However, research has primarily studied planar environments, and it is unclear how people will combine horizontal and vertical spatial information to make navigational decisions in a multilevel TSP. In this study, we asked 41 participants to first learn the locations of 12 shops (targets) in a multilevel building, and then complete a structure mapping task and two open 8-target M-TSP tasks (more than 40.000 alternatives). Using bayesian methods for mixed effects modelling, we show that human performance in navigational M-TSPs is lower than this of Euclidean TSPs, and we differentiate between the choice of tour (visit sequence) and transitions (local wayfinding). Our results show an effect of horizontal versus vertical learning. We also found that performance in navigational TSP are a composite of global and local decision making, and the people adaptively employ a path-based, rather than euclidean, measure of distance when this is ecologically relevant. Overall we provide multiple sources of evidence for the horizontal bias theory both in mental representations and wayfinding behaviour. This study contributes to current knowledge of mental representations 3D space and is the first huto provide human data on an multilevel TSP. More generally, these findings have implications for our understanding of wayfinding and navigational behaviour in multilevel environments.
    05 - Forschungs- oder Arbeitsbericht