Zahn, Carmen

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Zahn
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Carmen
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Zahn, Carmen

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Gerade angezeigt 1 - 10 von 12
  • Publikation
    How do enhanced videos support generative learning and conceptual understanding in individuals and groups?
    (Springer, 25.08.2023) Ruf, Alessia; Zahn, Carmen; Roos, Anna-Lena; Opwis, Klaus [in: Educational technology research and development]
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    Effects of Game Mode in Multiplayer Video Games on Intergenerational Social Interaction: Randomized Field Study
    (JMIR Publications, 16.02.2022) Zahn, Carmen; Leisner, David; Niederhauser, Mario; Roos, Anna-Lena; Iseli, Tabea; Soldati, Marco [in: JMIR Formative Research]
    Maintaining social relationships is a basic human need and particularly essential in old age, including when living in a retirement home. Multiplayer video games can promote positive social interactions among players from different generations while playing. Yet, such facilitation of positive social interactions depends on specific game design. To systematically investigate the effects of game design on social interaction between seniors and their coplayers, the game Myosotis FoodPlanet was developed in this study, and the impacts of 3 different game modes on social interaction were compared in a controlled field trial. This study aims to compare the effects of 3 different game modes (competitive, cooperative, and creative) on social interactions (verbal and nonverbal communication) between seniors and their younger coplayers. The results show that game mode can be an important factor for shaping the social interactions of players playing together. Compared with other modes, creative game modes can increase verbal communication. In contrast, competitive modes may stimulate more laughing together. This has important implications for game design and the use of computer games to promote social interaction between seniors and their coplayers in practice.
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    “Grandma! Grandpa! Let`s play together!” – Effects of game mode in multiplayer video games on intergenerational social interaction: A randomized field study
    (JMIR Publications, 2022) Zahn, Carmen; Leisner, David; Niederhauser, Mario; Roos, Anna-Lena; Iseli, Tabea; Soldati, Marco [in: JMIR Formative Research]
    Maintaining social relationships is a basic human need and particularly essential in old age, including when living in a retirement home. Multiplayer video games can promote the establishment and maintenance of social relationships, due to facilitating positive social interactions between players, even from different generations. Such facilitation of positive social interactions depends, however, on specific game design. The present study investigates the impacts of three different game modes on social interaction in a controlled field trial. Results reveal significant differences. Important implications on game design and the use of computer games for seniors in practice are discussed.
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    Do you see us?—Applied visual analytics for the investigation of group coordination
    (Springer, 18.03.2019) Rack, Oliver; Zahn, Carmen; Bleisch, Susanne [in: Gruppe. Interaktion. Organisation]
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    Collaboration on large interactive displays: a systematic review
    (Taylor & Francis, 2019) Zahn, Carmen; Mateescu, Magdalena; Pimmer, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Daniel; Reiterer, Harald [in: Human–Computer Interaction]
    Large Interactive Displays (LIDs), such as tabletops or interactive walls, are promising innovations, which are increasingly used to support co-located collaboration. Yet the current evidence base on the impact of LID use on collaborative processes and outcomes, and associated influencing factors, is fragmented, particularly in comparison with other media. To address this gap, a systematic review was carried out in the databases Web of Science, Psych.Info, ACM, Elsevier, JSTOR and Springer and in the ACM CHI conference database. A corpus of 38 articles with experimental study designs met the eligibility criteria and was analyzed in-depth. With regard to collaboration processes, the findings suggest a relatively clear advantage of the use of LIDs over classic forms of collaboration, in particular over single-user environments (e.g. laptops). With attention to collaborative outcomes, positive effects of LIDs were identified for knowledge gains and social encounters, and mixed effects for task-related outcomes. The analysis further shows relevant influencing factors of LID, such as the separation of personal and joint work spaces and the deployment of horizontal instead of vertical displays. Conceptual and practice implications are discussed.
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    A model for designing hypervideo-based instructional scenarios
    (Taylor & Francis, 08.06.2018) Cattaneo, Alberto A. P.; van der Meij, Hans; Aprea, Carmela; Sauli, Florinda; Zahn, Carmen [in: Interactive Learning Environments]
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    Using smartphones as rich, synchronous communication devices that facilitate knowledge processes - a randomized controlled trial
    (JMIR Publications, 13.02.2014) Pimmer, Christoph; Mateescu, Magdalena; Zahn, Carmen [in: Journal of Medical Internet Research]
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    Video clips for YouTube: Collaborative video creation as an educational concept for knowledge acquisition and attitude change related to obesity stigmatization. Education and Information Technologies
    (Springer, 13.02.2014) Zahn, Carmen; Schäffeler, Norbert; Giel, Karin Elisabeth; Wessel, Daniel; Thiel, Ansgar; Zipfel, Stephan; Hesse, Friedrich W. [in: Education and Information Technologies]
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    Smartphones as multimodal communication devices to facilitate clinical knowledge processes a randomized controlled trial
    (JMIR Publications, 01.11.2013) Pimmer, Christoph; Mateescu, Magdalena; Zahn, Carmen; Genewein, Urs [in: Journal of Medical Internet Research]
    Background: Despite the widespread use and advancements of mobile technology that facilitate rich communication modes, there is little evidence demonstrating the value of smartphones for effective interclinician communication and knowledge processes. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different synchronous smartphone-based modes of communication, such as (1) speech only, (2) speech and images, and (3) speech, images, and image annotation (guided noticing) on the recall and transfer of visually and verbally represented medical knowledge. Methods: The experiment was conducted from November 2011 to May 2012 at the University Hospital Basel (Switzerland) with 42 medical students in a masters program. All participants analyzed a standardized case (a patient with a subcapital fracture of the fifth metacarpal bone) based on a radiological image, photographs of the hand, and textual descriptions, and were asked to consult a remote surgical specialist via a smartphone. Participants were randomly assigned to 3 experimental conditions/groups. In group 1, the specialist provided verbal explanations (speech only). In group 2, the specialist provided verbal explanations and displayed the radiological image and the photographs to the participants (speech and images). In group 3, the specialist provided verbal explanations, displayed the radiological image and the photographs, and annotated the radiological image by drawing structures/angle elements (speech, images, and image annotation). To assess knowledge recall, participants were asked to write brief summaries of the case (verbally represented knowledge) after the consultation and to re-analyze the diagnostic images (visually represented knowledge). To assess knowledge transfer, participants analyzed a similar case without specialist support. Results: Data analysis by ANOVA found that participants in groups 2 and 3 (images used) evaluated the support provided by the specialist as significantly more positive than group 1, the speech-only group (group 1: mean 4.08, SD 0.90; group 2: mean 4.73, SD 0.59; group 3: mean 4.93, SD 0.25; F2,39=6.76, P=.003; partial 2=0.26, 1=.90). However, significant positive effects on the recall and transfer of visually represented medical knowledge were only observed when the smartphone-based communication involved the combination of speech, images, and image annotation (group 3). There were no significant positive effects on the recall and transfer of visually represented knowledge between group 1 (speech only) and group 2 (speech and images). No significant differences were observed between the groups regarding verbally represented medical knowledge. Conclusions: The results show (1) the value of annotation functions for digital and mobile technology for interclinician communication and medical informatics, and (2) the use of guided noticing (the integration of speech, images, and image annotation) leads to significantly improved knowledge gains for visually represented knowledge. This is particularly valuable in situations involving complex visual subject matters, typical in clinical practice.
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift
  • Publikation
    How to improve collaborative learning with video tools in the classroom? Social vs. cognitive guidance for student teams
    (Springer, 13.03.2013) Zahn, Carmen; Hesse, Friedrich W.; Krauskopf, Karsten; Pea, Roy [in: International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning]
    01A - Beitrag in wissenschaftlicher Zeitschrift